Black History Month: The History books don’t always get it right

Black History Month: The History books don’t always get it right

BE Connect Groups and Latinxs Connect ask you to Embrace Black Culture during Black History Month.

During this Black History Month, BE Connect and Latinxs Connect Groups will focus on both People and Community. There are many Black historical locations that may be within a couple of miles of where you live.

Throughout the month, several Albemarle employees will be sharing the history of some of those areas and what it means to them.

We would like for you to also participate this month and Embrace Black Culture actively. We urge everyone to visit some of those locations.

BE Connect Groups and Lantixs Connect ask you to Embrace Black Culture during Black History Month. During this month, BE Connect and Latinx Connect will focus on both People and Community. There are many black historical locations that may be within a couple of miles of where you live. Our employee's will be sharing the history of some of those areas and what it means to them.

We would like for you to participate this month and Embrace Black Culture actively. We urge everyone to visit some of those locations and provide us with your comments, pictures, and selfies.






History books don't always get the full story right. It's up to dedicated people to reveal the missing pieces, which gives us the full context and richness a story deserves. For Albemarle's Trinicia King, The Harvey B. Gantt Center in Charlotte, N.C., serves as a vehicle for people to celebrate African American art, history, and culture.

Harvey B. Gantt Center
Harvey B. Gantt Center, Charlotte, N.C.

"The Gantt Center fills in a lot of the gaps. I am excited that adults and children, who want further their education on this rich culture, have a place to go to find out information about the past and present endeavors of our people," King said.

This Center was the dream of many local community leaders to bring Black southern history to the mainstream public. Named after Harvey Bernard Gantt, a well-respected community leader and a trailblazer for Black culture. He was the first African American student admitted to Clemson University and later served as Charlotte's first African American mayor. The Center is an award-winning architectural design facility and stands as a symbol in the Charlotte skyline that Black history, art, and culture belong in all our collective minds.

The center brings in exhibitions from historical moments like sit-ins to the present-day Black Lives Matter movement. King believes this mix helps people place themselves in their shoes and accept Black Culture as American Culture. One exhibit King says touched her and gave her insight on life as a Black woman is the “A Woman’s Work” exhibit featuring collections from John and Vivian Hewitt. They exemplified the beauty and strength of women. It encompasses Black women and their many roles, identities, and experiences.

"Knowing the background and history of Black culture paves the way for change. Educating yourself about past injustices and triumphs of a culture completes the narrative. Understanding also brings compassion, which is needed to make the world a better place," King said.

As we continue to embrace Black culture during Black History Month, King hopes you will visit the Gantt Center for their unique cultural experiences year-round.

For more information on the Gantt Center and current Black History Month events: The Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts + Culture

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Trinicia King is part of Albemarle’s Information Technology team. She was born and raised in Charlotte, N.C. She received her Bachelor of Science degree in Information System from the University of North Carolina and Master’s in Business Administration from Pfeiffer University. She loves to write children’s books and has published thus far “An Open Mind: Teachable Moments Through Poetry.”